Like many from my generation, I too grew up with Forough Farrokhzad poetry. I used to carry her books to school and read them in my solitude. She was for me a resemblance of women’s emancipation, freedom and struggles. In high school, I gave a speech about the effect of her poetry in my Persian literature class and was given a portrait of her that hanged in my room for years. Many years later when I went back to Iran after the revolution it became a character in my first feature film, “Common Plight”. Her poetry was read by me in the film for the first time in the history of cinema film since the Iranian revolution. I knew during the twelve days of shooting, her documentary in Tabriz in a leper colony she became attached to Hossein the child of two lepers. She adopted the boy and brought him to live at her mother’s house who is a now a poet living in Germany.

During the shooting of my first documentary “Bababaghi” in the same place, I felt Forough’s presence more than ever. Years later I decided to make a documentary to her tribute. Though she died in 1963 but she still lives and is remembered among the elderly of that leper colony who saw her as a child. They wished people would visit them and hug them like she did in 1962 while filming “The House is Black”. To this day Forough Farrokhzad has a special place in the hearts and minds of most Iranians even today’s youth. I named the film after the title of my favorite poem “Only Voice Remains” and used her own voice in the film. It all seemed right in that white winter.

This personal documentary is my especial homage to a unique woman and poet. Hopefully, through this film we not only remember the effect of Forough but understand that lepers can have healthy children and yes we too can hug them.

I am thankful to musicians, actors, cameramen and editors who supported me in the of making this film.